Managing Business Finances Since 2015

Our Value Added Services


Tax

Tax Advice and Returns Including Corporation Tax, VAT, Capital Gains and Many Others.

Accounts

Business Accounts Services Including Annual Accounts, Forecasting, Company Valuations and More.

Audits

Statutory Audits, Client Money Audits, Grant Expenditure Reports and Independent Examinations.

People

Personal Tax, Returns & Planning

Businesses

Small & Medium Enterprises

Groups

Clubs & Registered Charities

Entrepreneurs

Consultants and Self-Employed

Client's Feedback

What People Say


Our latest blog posts

News And Updates


Child benefit payments

The weekly rates of child benefit for the only or eldest child in a family is currently £20.70 and the weekly rate for all other children is £13.70. These rates have remained unchanged for some time. Taxpayers entitled to the child benefit should be aware that HMRC usually stop paying child benefit on the 31 August following a child’s 16th Birthday. Under qualifying circumstances, the child benefit payment can continue until a child reaches their 20th birthday if they stay in approved education or training.

Child benefit is usually payable for children who come to the UK, however, there are a number of rules which must be met in order to claim. HMRC must be notified without delay if a child receiving child benefit moves permanently abroad.

It is also possible to claim Guardian’s Allowance if you are bringing up someone else’s child because one or both parents have died. The Guardian’s Allowances is paid on top of child benefit and is currently £17.60 per week.

Beware related tax charge

The High Income Child Benefit charge applies to higher rate taxpayers whose income exceeds £50,000 in a tax year and who are in receipt of child benefit. The charge either reduces or removes the financial benefit of receiving child benefit. Where both partners have an income that exceeds £50,000, the charge will apply to the partner with the highest income.

For taxpayers with income above £60,000, the amount of the charge will equal the amount of child benefit received. Taxpayers have the choice: to keep receiving child benefit and pay the tax charge through Self Assessment or elect to stop receiving child benefit and not pay the charge.

What is a Close Company?

A Close Company is broadly defined as a company that is controlled by:

  • five or fewer participators or
  • any number of participators who are also directors or
  • where more than half the assets would be distributed to five or fewer participators, or to participators who are directors, in the event of the winding up of the company.

A participator is broadly somebody who has a share or interest in the capital or income of a company, such as having share capital, voting rights or a right to capital on winding up of the company. This can be a shareholder, director or a loan creditor.

Most small private companies will meet the definition of a Close Company and there are some specific tax rules that apply to these companies, for example, where a close company pays for personal expenses of a director, or makes a loan to one of its participators.